Yearbook Process & Production – SchoolAnnual.com

This post is the fourth in a series Yearbook Process and Production. In this series I’ll be sharing how different homeschool groups create their yearbooks and we’ll include critiques of the different software programs that we used. If you would like to have information included about your yearbook program, be sure to include a comment below.

YPP-series

Anne Campbell

learningtable.blogspot.com

Who is the yearbook for?

Support Group Yearbook

Who does the yearbook layout?

Mostly the students, with parent help.

Do you have a yearbook club or class?

Yes, we did.  I was the advisor for several years for our support group.  I had a group of 6-8 middle and high school students who met twice a month to learn and work on layouts.  All photos were submitted by parents online and then categorized into folders for each layout.  The students worked independently with my guidance, then me and another mom edited and proofed the entire book.  We had another mom do the ad section.

How many yearbooks do you typically produce a year?

75

How many pages?

48

Color or BW?

Color

Softcover or hard cover?

Hard cover

What was your cost per book?

Around $46, some of which was paid for by ads.

If you did any fundraiser to decrease the cost to your families, what did you charge for your book?

We sold each book for $25 due to ad sales.

What software did you use? What company did you use to print your yearbook?

We didn’t use a software, but we had online access to the layout program through the publisher: School Annual.com

What were the pros and cons of your program?

We had to order a minimum of 75 books which was more than we needed, so we had lots left over.  It was difficult to get parental support from all members, so the bulk of the work (planning, sales, etc,) rested on a few.

What improvements would you like to make next time? 

After several years of having one, we discontinued the book this year due to low participation.

Please share any photos or additional comments. 

My family wants to make our own yearbook this year, but I don’t know of a service for just a couple of books that isn’t prohibitively expensive.  The yearbooks we produced in the past were stellar, but since our support group had gotten so small, it just wasn’t feasible to continue.

Yearbook Process & Production Series – Scrapbook Style

This post is the second in a series Yearbook Process and Production. In this series I’ll be sharing how different homeschool groups create their yearbooks and we’ll include critiques of the different software programs that we used. If you would like to have information included about your yearbook program, be sure to include a comment below.

YPP-series

Today my friend Renita Terrell from Homedaze blog shares about her homeschool group’s yearbook done in a traditional scrapbook style.

Who is the yearbook for?

Our yearbook is for the families in our homeschool group.

Who does the yearbook layout?

The moms do the yearbook.  We do it in a scrapbooking style with pictures we have taken all year.

Do you have a yearbook club or class?

No.

How many yearbooks do you typically produce a year?

19 or so, depending on how many families we have in our group each year.

How many pages?

40-50.

Color or BW?

Color.

Softcover or hard cover?

Softcover with a comb-binding.  There is a clear plastic cover on the front and a thicker cardstock on the back.

What was your cost per book?

$12-15 per book

If you did any fundraiser to decrease the cost to your families, what did you charge for your book?

We have done a few fundraisers and offset the cost of the books to about $5 a book.

What software did you use? 

We don’t use software.  We put them together on paper/scrapbooking.  Then take them to a printers.

What company did you use to print your yearbook? 

A local company.

What were the pros and cons of your program? 

The moms love to get together and eat and visit while we put the books together.  But, it is a long night and sometimes the pages don’t get done in time.

What improvements would you like to make next time? 

Making sure we have all the pictures we need!

Yearbook Homework for the Mamas

Shakespeare

Have you seen this image?

It has recently been passed around Facebook and Pinterest. I’ve seen similar ones before… I’m sure you have too.

It made me think about what words are new to us these days. Words that have seeped into our vocabulary without a lot of awareness. Words that we hear other people use… and suddenly we’re using them too.

The English language constantly changes. After all, the only languages that don’t change are dead languages.

New words are in essence a verbal time capsule that reflects what is going on in our world today. One of the more popular items in our homeschool group’s yearbook is the time capsule page. The student’s enjoy identifying items and images that they know reflect their high school years. They know what’s “Popular”.

But when I asked them to identify words that reflect our current times, words that were new during their lifetime… it wasn’t quite as easy. We’re often immune to how easily words slip into our vocabulary.

There is a fun comedy from 1941 starring Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck, Ball of Fire. “A group of ivory-tower lexicographers realize they need to hear how real people talk, and end up helping a beautiful singer avoid police and escape from the Mob.”

Professor Berthram Potts (Gary Cooper) leads his geriatric group of professors in a study of 1940’s language that is “hip” and “cool”. He discovers how challenging the study of language is as it evolves so quickly.

Professor Bertram Potts: That man talked a living language; I embalmed some dead phrases.

Looking back at the 1940’s, we can easily see words and phrases that are iconic to that time period. Just as easily as we can look back on Shakespeare and identify the words he gifted us with.

But what about today? This is a question that is typically easier for the mamas to answer than it is for the students. It’s one of those many areas in life where age is a blessing.

What words will you look back on and know that they reflect 2012?